Biomedical Engineering Jobs
Your Career As a Biomedical Engineer


Biomedical Engineering Jobs
Biomedical Engineering blends traditional engineering techniques with biological sciences and medicine to improve the quality of human health and life. The discipline focuses both on understanding complex living systems - via experimental and analytical techniques - and on development of devices, methods and algorithms that advance medical and biological knowledge while improving the effectiveness and delivery of clinical medicine.



What is Biomedical Engineering?


Biomedical engineers develop devices and procedures that solve medical and health-related problems by combining their knowledge of biology and medicine with engineering principles and practices. Many do research, along with medical scientists, to develop and evaluate systems and products such as artificial organs, prostheses (artificial devices that replace missing body parts), instrumentation, medical information systems, and health management and care delivery systems. Biomedical engineers also may design devices used in various medical procedures, imaging systems such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and devices for automating insulin injections or controlling body functions. Most engineers in this specialty need a sound background in another engineering specialty, such as mechanical or electronics engineering, in addition to specialized biomedical training. Some specialties within biomedical engineering are biomaterials, biomechanics, medical imaging, rehabilitation engineering, and orthopedic engineering. - Biomedical Engineering Job


Qualification and Education


A bachelor's degree in engineering is required for almost all entry-level engineering jobs. College graduates with a degree in a natural science or mathematics occasionally may qualify for some engineering jobs, especially in specialties that are in high demand. Most engineering degrees are granted in electrical and electronics engineering, mechanical engineering, and civil engineering. However, engineers trained in one branch may work in related branches. For example, many aerospace engineers have training in mechanical engineering. This flexibility allows employers to meet staffing needs in new technologies and specialties in which engineers may be in short supply. It also allows engineers to shift to fields with better employment prospects or to those which more closely match their interests. Biomedical Engineering Job That Pay $80,000


In addition to the standard engineering degree, many colleges offer 2-year or 4-year degree programs in engineering technology. These programs, which usually include various hands-on laboratory classes that focus on current issues in the application of engineering principles, prepare students for practical design and production work, rather than for jobs that require more theoretical and scientific knowledge. Graduates of 4-year technology programs may get jobs similar to those obtained by graduates with a bachelor's degree in engineering. Engineering technology graduates, however, are not qualified to register as professional engineers under the same terms as graduates with degrees in engineering. Some employers regard technology program graduates as having skills between those of a technician and an engineer.


Licensure All 50 States and the District of Columbia require licensure for engineers who offer their services directly to the public. Engineers who are licensed are called professional engineers (PEs). This licensure generally requires a degree from an ABET-accredited engineering program, 4 years of relevant work experience, and completion of a State examination. Recent graduates can start the licensing process by taking the examination in two stages. The initial Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) examination can be taken upon graduation. Engineers who pass this examination commonly are called engineers in training (EITs) or engineer interns (EIs). After acquiring suitable work experience, EITs can take the second examination, called the Principles and Practice of Engineering exam. Several States have imposed mandatory continuing education requirements for relicensure. Most States recognize licensure from other States, provided that the manner in which the initial license was obtained meets or exceeds their own licensure requirements. Many civil, mechanical, and chemical engineers are licensed PEs. Independently of licensure, various certification programs are offered by professional organizations to demonstrate competency in specific fields of engineering.- Biomedical Engineering Job


Employment

Biomedical Engineering Job - In 2008, engineers held about 1.6 million jobs. Following is the distribution of employment by engineering specialty:


Engineering Job Title Employment
Civil engineers
278,400
Mechanical engineers
238,700
Industrial engineers
214,800
Electrical engineers
157,800
Electronics engineers
except computer
143,700
Computer hardware engineers
74,700
Aerospace engineers
71,600
Environmental engineers
54,300
Chemical engineers
31,700
Health and safety engineers,
except mining safety engineers and inspectors
25,700
Materials engineers
24,400
Petroleum engineers
21,900
Nuclear engineers
16,900
Biomedical engineers
16,000
Marine engineers and naval architects
8,500
Mining and geological engineers, including mining safety engineers
7,100
Agricultural engineers
2,700
Engineers, all other
183,200


About 36 percent of engineering jobs were found in manufacturing industries, and another 30 percent were in the professional, scientific, and technical services industries, primarily in architectural, engineering, and related services. Many engineers also worked in the construction, telecommunications, and wholesale trade industries.


Job Outlook

Biomedical Engineering Job - Employment of engineers is expected to grow about as fast as the average for all occupations over the next decade, but growth will vary by specialty. Biomedical engineers should experience the fastest growth, while civil engineers should see the largest employment increase. Overall engineering employment is expected to grow by 11 percent over the 2008–18 decade, about as fast as the average for all occupations.



Biomedical Engineering Jobs Related Resources


Biomedical Engineering Jobs in Health Care Industry


Back to 30 Jobs That Pay 80000
Back To Ideas for Home Business-Wellness Industry
From Biomedical Engineering Jobs To For Your Dream Career Home Page


Copyright ©2006-2014 For-Your-Dream-Career.com

Protected by Copyscape Plagiarism Checker