Federal Government Jobs
Your Government Jobs and Careers


Federal Government Jobs and Careers - With more than 1.8 million civilian employees, the Federal Government, excluding the Postal Service is the Nation’s largest employer....



Federal Government Jobs and Careers


Significant Points

<

  • With more than 1.8 million civilian employees, the Federal Government, excluding the Postal Service is the Nation’s largest employer.
  • About 9 out of 10 Federal employees work outside the Washington, DC metropolitan area.
  • Job growth generated by increased homeland security needs will be offset by projected declines in other Federal sectors; however, many job openings should arise from the need to replace workers who retire or leave the Federal Government for other reasons.
  • Competition is expected for many Federal positions, especially during times of economic uncertainty, when workers seek the stability of Federal employment.


Employment

  • In January 2007, the Federal Government, excluding the Postal Service employed about 1.8 million civilian workers. The Federal Government is the Nation’s single largest employer. Because data on employment in certain agencies cannot be released to the public for national security reasons, this total does not include employment for the Central Intelligence Agency, National Security Agency, Defense Intelligence Agency, and National Imagery and Mapping Agency. Federal Government Jobs and Careers
  • The Federal Government makes an effort to have a workforce as diverse as the Nation’s civilian labor force. The Federal Government serves as a model for all employers in abiding by equal employment opportunity legislation, which protects current and potential employees from discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, or age. The Federal Government also makes a special effort to recruit and accommodate persons with disabilities.
  • Even though the headquarters of most Federal departments and agencies are based in the Washington, DC, area, only 16 percent of Federal employees worked in the vicinity of the Nation’s Capital in 2007. In addition to Federal employees working throughout the United States, about 92,000, which includes foreign nationals, are assigned overseas, mostly in embassies or defense installations.


Outlook


  • Wage and salary employment in the Federal Government is projected to decline by 4.6 percent over the 2006-16 period. Some job growth will be generated by increased homeland security needs. There is projected slow growth or declines in other Federal sectors due to governmental cost-cutting, the growing use of private contractors, and continuing devolution—the practice of turning over the development, implementation, and management of some programs of the Federal Government to State and local governments. However, many job openings should arise from the need to replace workers who retire or leave the Federal Government for other reasons. Federal Government Jobs and Careers

  • Employment change. Staffing levels in Federal Government, while relatively stable in the short run, can be subject to change in the long run primarily because of changes in public policies as legislated by the Congress, which affect spending levels and hiring decisions for the various departments and agencies. In general, over the coming decade, domestic programs are likely to see cuts in their budgets as Congress seeks to reduce the Federal budget deficit, but the cuts will likely affect some agencies more than others. Any employment declines, however, generally will be carried out through attrition—simply not replacing workers who retire or leave the Federal Government for other reasons. Layoffs, called “reductions in force,” have occurred in the past, but they are uncommon and usually affect relatively few workers.
  • While there will be job openings in all types of jobs over the coming decade, demand will continue to grow for specialized workers in areas related to border and transportation security, emergency preparedness, public health, and information analysis. - Federal Government Jobs


Earnings

In March 2007, the average earnings of Federal Government Employment for full-time workers paid under the General Schedule were $65,463.


Occupation Salary
All occupations $65,463
General attorney $111,304
Financial management $101,022
General engineering $100,051
Economist $94,098
Computer science $90,929
Chemistry $89,954
Criminal investigating $88,174
Microbiology $87,206
Architecture $87,128
Statistics $85,690
Information technology management $81,524
Librarian $80,873
Accounting $78,665
Chaplain $78,030
Ecology $76,511
Human resources management $76,503
Mine safety and health $73,003
Air traffic control $72,049
Budget analysis $71,267
Correctional officer $67,140
Nurse$65,345
Engineering technical$63,951
Border patrol agent$63,550
Medical technologist$59,840
Customs and border protection$59,248
Legal assistance$46,912
Fire protection and prevention$43,407
Secretary$42,334
Police$42,150
Tax examining$38,290
Human resources assistance$37,835
Nursing assistant$33,134


Job Resources at Major U.S. Government Agencies


These are links to Federal Government Jobs and Careers information Web pages at several major U.S. Government agencies and their sub-agencies. To find job openings matched to your specific qualifications, expertise or areas of interest, use the Federal Government Employment U.S. Government Job tool.



Federal Government Jobs and Careers Source: Beaure of Labor Statistics



Federal Government Jobs and Careers


Back from Federal Government Jobs to Career Index
Back to For Your Dream Career Home Page


Copyright ©2006-2014 For-Your-Dream-Career.com

Protected by Copyscape Plagiarism Checker